The Treasure of the Sierra Nevada

Sierra Nevada beers served at the White Horse Parson's Green
Sierra Nevada beers served at the White Horse Parson’s Green

There is much talk of consolidation in beer circles at the moment. It seems to received wisdom on both sides of the Atlantic seems to be that the craft beer boom has left us overbreweried, which will inevitably lead to the big global players snapping up bargains by buying out the biggest craft players, while many of the smaller ones will simply fall by the wayside.

I’ve no real idea whether that’s true or not, and no strong opinion on whether or not it’s a bad thing if it is. Anecdotally, I know that a number of smaller brewers in the UK have quietly shut up shop recently, but it’s hard to say if that’s a trend. The nature of business failure is that breweries tend to arrive with a PR fanfare and depart with barely a whisper.

Equally, I know craft purists who vowed that not another drop of Camden Town Brewery beer would pass their lips after the business was sold to AB InBev in 2015, and who have sworn off BrewDog since its founders sold 22% of the company to private equity firm TSG Consumer Partners earlier this year.

Personally, I find that I can enjoy Meantime IPA just as well now that the merry-go-round has stopped and it’s owned by Asahi of Japan, and I have no doubt I’ll continue to enjoy a pint of Young’s Ordinary when Marston’s takes over the brand just as much as I did when Wandsworth’s finest first moved to Bedford under the stewardship of Charles Wells. I’ve worked with at least two entrepreneurs who’ve swanned off with a few mill as a result of flogging the fruits of their labours, and I don’t begrudge them a penny of it – although the fact that I’m still working and they’re not is a good indicator of the extent of my own business acumen. 

Steve Grossman at Sierra Nevada dinner at the White Horse Parson's Green
Steve Grossman at Sierra Nevada dinner at the White Horse Parson’s Green

Nevertheless, it’s also good to know that there are independent breweries out there that stick to their guns. So, I was delighted to accept an invitation recently to a beer and food matching dinner at south west London’s temple of beer, the White Horse at Parson’s Green. The event was hosted by Steve Grossman of California’s Sierra Nevada brewery, one of the true pioneers of the US craft beer movement. The event was part of pub group Mitchells & Butler’s summer craft beer festival, and an opportunity to sample some Sierra Nevada beers we don’t see as often over here as the Pale Ale or Torpedo Extra IPA.

Founded in the 1970s by Steve’s brother Ken, over the years Sierra Nevada has built a repertoire of seasonal and speciality beers, with its passion for hops at the heart of its programme,  that keep it’s loyal customers coming back for more. Sierra Nevada remains resolutely family-owned, with a new generation of Grossmans now coming into the business.  

Steve admitted to me they’d had some “interesting conversations” with bigger players over the years but, in line with the brewery’s commitment to sustainability and long-term investment – Sierra Nevada has won awards for its approach to energy and water use at its two US breweries – there are no plans to change the ownership structure.

Given that Sierra Nevada Pale Ale is a top 20 US beer brand, the Grossmans seem to be doing a pretty good job without outside funding. In the UK, the beers are distributed by Fuller’s, with the flagship beers now a standard part of the back bar fridge range in Fuller’s pubs. 

The menu at the White Horse was:

*Asparagus salad with Sierra Nevada Summerfest

*Palate cleanser – Sierra Nevada Peach IPA sorbet

* Lamb rump with Sierra Nevada River Ryed

* Rhubarb crumble with Sierra Nevada Tropical Torpedo

*Cheese board – Stinking Bishop, Colston Basset blue, Keen’s Cheddar and Innes goats cheese log with Torpedo.

Cheeseboard at Sierra Nevada dinner at the White Horse Parson's Green
Cheeseboard at Sierra Nevada dinner at the White Horse Parson’s Green

Of the beers themselves, the Sierra Nevada Torpedo Tropical IPA  is definitely one I’ll seek out again. Made with Amarillo, Mosaic, Citra, El Dorado and Comet hops, it has wonderful flavours of mango, papaya, and passionfruit to counter the intense hop character. River Ryed has real pepper/spice notes that would, I suspect, make it a beer that would go sublimely with a vindaloo.

Of the food matches, the kitchen team at the White Horse produced superb food, with Sierra Nevada Peach IPA sorbet a real highlight. However, they saved the best for last. The cheeseboard, especially the Colston Basset blue cheese, was an inspired match with Torpedo Extra IPA, with the intensely bitter Magnum, Crystal and Citra hops a true contrast to the rich, sticky sweet/savoury cheese.

So, long may Sierra Nevada stay independent.  Unless they don’t. In which case, f*** it, I’m still having a Torpedo with my Stilton at Christmas.

You for coffee? Tim Hortons rolls into the UK

Tim Hortons is opening in the UKI’m as gung-ho for a cup of coffee and a doughnut as the next man, but Glasgow seems a long way to go from my base in south London. So, I initially noted the news that Canadian café brand Tim Hortons is coming to the UK with a certain amount of detachment; given that the initial store opens in Argyle Street in May.

The fact that I have almost no idea what a Tim Hortons is might also explain my muted enthusiasm, although the huge outpouring of joy on social media at the announcement of the brand’s imminent arrival in Canada’s mother country suggested I was in a minority. When an invitation arrived to a launch event at Canada House, the Trafalgar Square HQ of all things Canadian, it felt like Tim Hortons was meeting me more than halfway – from either Glasgow or Canada – so it would have been churlish to say no.

I’m not the only one asking,  the world is divided, I discover, into those who have no idea what Tim Hortons is, and those who rave about it. Tim Hortons was founded by its namesake, a professional ice hockey player, as a single site café in Hamilton, Ontario in the 1960s. Today eight out of 10 cups of coffee sold across Canada are served at a Tim Hortons and more than 5.3 million Canadians – approximately 15 per cent of the population – visit the brand daily.

As well as its own blend of coffee, the brand specialises in sweet snacks including bite-sized doughnuts called Timbits, which come in a variety of flavours. On the savoury side, the offer includes blinis, wraps and bagels, with a focus on all-day trading form breakfast through to late night.

Tim Hortons is opening in the UKSo, on a Monday morning I flashed my Press card at the door of Canada House, negotiated my way through the airport-style security, and joined a group that was equal parts jaded media types and impossibly enthusiastic Canadians. These included the High Commissioner, Janice Charette, who enthusiastically set out Tim Hortons stall for the assembled company.  

“I’m a hockey mom. So sharing it with my kids and my husband, or drinking it in a freezing cold arena at 7am in the morning, those are the kinds of memories I hope will be created by our UK friends as well.”

I fell at the first hurdle. I failed to order the signature Double-Double coffee, served with two creams and two sugars which is “just as the Canadians like it” according to the press release, opting instead for a black dark roast. I was called up on my choice by Gurprit Dhaliwal, a director of SK Group, which is working with brand owner Restaurant Brand International on the UK roll out of Tim Hortons. It was, I acknowledge, a fairly pathetic effort my part to plead my waistline even as I chomped through yes another sugar-coated doughnut.

The master plan, Gurprit told me, calls for a minimum of 100 UK outlets once the Argyle Street café is up and running in Glasgow. As well as further flagship sites in major cities, including London, they also expects to see Tim Hortons open in the same neighbourhood, leisure and drive-through sites that have taken the brand into almost every Canadian town and city.

Tim Hortons is opening in the UKHe said: “Flagship stores are important initially, to establish the brand with UK customers, but Tim Hortons is very adaptable. It’s an all-day concept from breakfast right through to late evening, so we trade longer hours than other brands. In Canada there are successful 24-hour drive through sites, which we’d also look at here.”

The question, for those of us unlikely to be taking our offspring to early morning hockey practice any time soon, is how does Tim Horton fit into the UK market? We have the most developed coffee bar market in Europe, according to specialist analyst Allegra. There are more than 22,000 coffee outlet in the UK generating sales of around £9bn. It’s fair to say that home-grown players like Caffe Nero and the Whitbread-owned Costa brand, as well as imported brands with an established foothold, notably Starbucks, won’t go out of their way to make it easy for Tim Hortons to establish a foothold.

Tim Hortons is opening in the UKGurprit told me that the all-day food offer will help to drive the brand’s offer, enabling them to start with breakfast and trade right through the day and close later than some of the competition.

You can decide for yourself on Canada Day – July 1, as no one needs reminding – when Tim Hortons is sponsoring a “bring a Brit” event in Trafalgar Square with free coffee and doughnuts for all. Just remember, if you don’t have the Double Double, they’ll want to know why.